Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (2024)

Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (1)

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony was made for legendary moments. And we’ve gotten a bunch over the years.

Legendary bands have reunited. Artists you wouldn't think would ever collaborate took the stage together. And, every once in a while, you get a landmark showcase that takes your breath away.

Our list of the greatest performances in ceremony history takes into account skill, but also the historical nature of the performances, most of which feature the greatest artists of all time.

Unfortunately, we didn’t get any live performances in 2020 due to the pandemic. But it looks like we’ll be able to add more to this amazing list after the Class of 2021 takes the stage later. this year.

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Frank Micelotta

1. George Harrison Tribute (2004)

How could we not start here? But before we get to the moment that cements this as the greatest performance in Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony history, let's look at what happened first. Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne, Steve Winwood and Dhani Harrison delivered a quality version of The Traveling Wilbury's "Handle With Care." Then came the showstopper. Their performance of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" was already pretty damn great when a figure emerged from the shadows. It was Prince, who had already performed during the night. Yet, he was about to outdo that stellar performance with a colossal guitar solo. Watching the smiles on Petty and Harrison's face tell the entire story. The skill and showmanship make this the single greatest moment in Rock Hall Induction history and one of the best live performances you will ever see. It's more than 68 million views on YouTube prove it.

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Frankie Ziths

2. All-Star Jam (1986)

On names alone, this is one of the greatest live performances in music history. The inaugural Induction Ceremony didn't feature individual performances for each artist. Instead, there was just one massive All-Star Jam featuring Chuck Berry, Steve Winwood, Jerry Lee Lewis, Keith Richards, John Fogerty, Chubby Checker, the Rock Hall Jam Band and whoever else could fit on the stage. There were several standout moments. But at the center of most of them was Berry, who was notorious for being a little rough around the edges in terms of his personality. But that didn't stop EVERYONE from wanting to play with him. And it brought Berry alive. He seemed to be having the time of his life playing alongside Richards, Stevie Ray Vaughan and others. It was a party like no other.

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Associated Press

3. All-Star Jam (1992)

Here's the talent that was on stage for the 1992 All-Star Jam: Neil Young, Jimmy Page, Johnny Cash, The Edge, Carlos Santana, Keith Richards, Booker T. and the M.G.'s with Steve Cropper, The Isley Brothers, John Fogerty and Little Richard, among others. And, boy, did they perform the hits, from "Soul Man" to "Shout" to "Big River." Young stood in for Jimi Hendrix on "All Along The Watchtower" while everyone got their chance to solo on the star-studded "Green Onions." It was, by far, the most well-organized jam session the annual Induction Ceremony had featured up until that point.

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Courtesy of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

4. All-Star Jam (1988)

The All Star Jam didn't have to always make sense. For instance, Mick Jagger led a 1988 performance of the Rolling Stone's "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," despite the band not being inducted until a year later. No one was complaining. Jagger was on fire and eventually joined on the mic, in thrilling fashion, by Bruce Springsteen. Those in attendance also saw The Beach Boys perform "Barbara Ann," Bob Dylan play "Like a Rolling Stone" and Ben E. King (inducted with the Drifters) slay "Stand By Me" (with Julian Lennon). But the big moment came when Ringo Star and George Harrison (the two Beatles in attendance for the band's induction) were joined on stage by Billy Joel, Springsteen, Dylan and Jagger on "I Saw Her Standing There." Heck, you know a concert is great when Les Paul performing "All Along the Watchtower" is simply a cherry on top.

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Michael Loccisano

5. All-Star Jam (2009)

The night's All-Star Jam had two parts. A group of performers teamed up for "Jailhouse Rock," which was nice. But what came after was truly epic. Metallica's James Hetfield called it "rhythm guitar player heaven." And he was right. Hetfield sang vocals on "The Train Kept A-Rollin'" with Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Kirk Hammett and Joe Perry behind him, taking turns shredding. What's perhaps even more thrilling than the solos is the pure joy on each of their faces. This is what the Rock Hall Ceremony was meant for – a once in a lifetime kind of moment.

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Evan Agostini

6. Tom Waits (2011)

Waits' 2011 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction performance was mezmerising. That night's bluesy version of "Make It Rain" is one of the best you'll ever see. The same goes for the haunting rendition of "Rain Dog" that Waits delivered his unique crooning while playing on acoustic guitar. It's one of the most diverse performances in Rock Hall Ceremony history. The ballad "House Where Nobody Lives" radiated with beauty, while Neil Young joined in for the guitar-driven on "Get Behind the Mule." Waits performed more songs than anyone that night and it left you wanting more.

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7. Led Zeppelin (1995)

In one of the most epic reunions and performances in Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony history, Led Zeppelin played a whopping five songs, along snippets of a few other classics. Essentially, what you got was a 25-minute Zeppelin concert that featured Jason Bonham on drums and guest appearances from Steven Tyler, Joe Perry and Neil Young. Tyler and Robert Plant trading vocals (especially on "Train Kept A-Rollin'") was a hard-rock fan's dream. But it was the thunderous version of "When The Levee Breaks" that truly brought the house down.

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8. Ruth Brown (1993)

It's the performance that kicks off the media show and film in the Rock Hall museum's Connor Theater, and for good reason. Brown, one of the most important singers of all time, is absolutely on fire during her performance of "(Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean," accompanied by Bonnie Raitt (her guitar solo is fantastic) and an on-point backing band.

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9. The Velvet Underground (1996)

The Velvet Underground’s performance was one of the more unique in Rock Hall history. The Patti Smith Group gave a solid performance of The Velvet Underground’s “Pale Blue Eyes.” But it was “Last Night I Said Goodbye to My Friend,” a new tune written for rhythm guitarist Sterling Morrison who passed away the previous August, that stole the show. And all three living members – Lou Reed, Maureen Tucker and Mr. Cale – were there to deliver the emotional wallop.

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Kathy Willens

10. All Star Jam (1999)

The 1999 ceremony marked an official return of the finale jam session, which included Paul McCartney surprisingly walking up on stage to "Let It Be." He remained to sing a stirring rendition of "Blue Suede Shoes," where Eric Clapton took on guitar duties. Meanwhile, Lauryn Hill and Bono sang on "People Get Ready," while Billy Joel led the way on Ray Charles' "What'd I Say." It was one of the most star studded jams in Rock Hall history.

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11. The Cure (2019)

It’s not stretch to say The Cure stole the show in 2019 and the producers gave the band the space to put on an epic performance. The band’s set was everything fans could have dreamed of, stretching across five songs. The peak moment came with the lengthy rendition of “A Forest” that was enough to give you chills. The Cure waited longer than it should have to enter the Rock Hall, but the performance was certainly worth the wait.

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Kevin Kane

12. Prince (2004)

It's easy to forget, after seeing his earth-shattering solo during the George Harrison tribute, that Prince also performed to celebrate his own induction in 2004. As you can guess, it was pretty amazing. Prince opened with a version of "Let's Go Crazy" that set the crowd on fire, before following up with "Sign o' the Times" and a funk-driven rendition of "Kiss" that found the Purple One pulling out some stellar dance moves.

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Julie Jacobson

13. U2 (2005)

U2 was the clear headliner at the 2005 ceremony and milked it for all it was worth. Bruce Springsteen joined the band on “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.” The Edge had to show him (rather quickly) how the song was being played, but once it got going, it was special. Elsewhere, Bono strolled through the crowd during a riveting performance of “Until the End of the World.” The Rock Hall got very lucky, as U2 was just starting its “Vertigo Tour,” which meant the band was in perfect form.

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Danny Moloshok

14. Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble Tribute (2015)

Let's face it – guitar showcases always work best at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductions. So it's not surprising that the tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble was a big hit. The living members of Double Trouble were joined by Jimmie Vaughan, John Mayer, Gary Clark Jr. and Doyle Brahmhall II. Not only did each guitarist take turns slaying "Pride and Joy," "Six Strings Down" and "Texas Flood," but the vocals were a nice match as well, especially from Clark Jr. and Mayer.

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Charles Sykes

15. Nirvana (2014)

One of the biggest question marks heading into the 2014 ceremony was who would Nirvana have stand in for Kurt Cobain. Names like Eddie Vedder, Michael Stipe and even Dave Grohl were thrown around. But Grohl and Krist Novoselic made the wise decision of having women sing lead on four Nirvana songs. Part of the appeal had to do with the novelty of it all. Each woman brought something different to the table. Joan Jett simply had to chill during “Smells Like Teen Spirit” while Grohl and company went berserk on their instruments. Kim Gordon was unhinged in every way Cobain would be during “Aneurysm.” Annie Clark of St. Vincent might have been a bit too reserved during “Lithium.” And Lorde was just downright, amazingly weird on “All Apologies.”

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Susan Ragan

16. All-Star Jam (1989)

The 1988 rendition of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" was so good, that Jagger led it again in 1999 when the Stones were actually induction. This time he had his band, Springsteen, Stevie Wonder, Little Richard and Tina Turner with him. It didn't raise quite as many goosebumps as the 1988 jam. Though, Wonder was a firecracker, kicking things off with "Uptight (Everything Is Alright)." Wonder served as bandleader of sorts as David Ruffin of The Temptations sang "My Girl" and was accompanied by Mick Jagger for "Ain't Too Proud To Beg." Dion sang "The Wanderer" and just about everyone sang The Temptations "Get Ready." But the star of the night had to be Tina Turner (on hand to induct Phil Spector). She oozed sex appeal joining Jagger on the mic for "Honky Tonk Woman" and then absolutely decimated all with "River Deep – Mountain High."

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Kevork Djansezian

17. Cream (1993)

The opening sounds of Eric Clapton’s guitar on “Sunshine of Your Love” meant it was time for the reunion most had been waiting for at the 1993 ceremony. Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker’s performance as Cream was something to behold. Sure, the band was rusty, but Clapton carried the other members. This was the type of special performance the Rock Hall Ceremony was tailor made for.

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L.M. Otero

18. Al Green (1995)

Green took everyone to church during his performance of "Take Me to the River." It stands as one of the most dynamic vocal performances in the ceremony's history with Green attempting to get every member of the audience on their feet. And when it comes to blending genres, Green's performance of "Funny How Time Slips Away" with Willie Nelson was surprisingly fun.

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Kathy Willens

19. Talking Heads (2002)

You know you've delivered an amazing performance when the talk afterwards centers on a potential reunion tour. That didn't happen, making Talking Heads' 2002 reunion at the Rock Hall Ceremony feel even more special. It's the perfect example of a Rock Hall reunion taking place the right way.

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Kathy Willens

20. Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band (1999)

The E Street Band was not included as an inductee with Springsteen, which served as a controversial choice until the band was actually inducted separately in 2014. Still, the E Street Band was there in 1999 to back up its leader. Needless to say, it was one of the most anticipated performances in Rock Hall Ceremony history. And Springsteen didn’t disappoint. He performed “The Promise Land,” “Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out” a seven and half minute version of “Backstreets.” All of it was amazing and came with the added bonus of Wilson Pickett joining the band for “In the Midnight Hour.”

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Seth Wenig

21. Ahmet Ertegun Tribute (2007)

There aren't too many ways to go about a tribute better than having Aretha Franklin step to the microphone. Franklin paid tribute to Ahmet Ertegun by performing "Don't' Play That Song" and "I Never Loved a Woman (the Way I Love You)." First, she owns the stage, instructing the band on how loud she wants the music. She then delivers a fantastic vocal that shakes the room.

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22. The Band (1994)

Fans didn’t get the full reunion of The Band they’d hoped for, as Levon Helm sat out due to his long-running feud with Robbie Robertson. Though, presenter Eric Clapton did join the group for “The Weight.” The performance closed the night and Clapton (with his epic guitar solo) proved a perfect fit.

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Tomothy A. Clark

23. Buddy Guy (2005)

Buddy Guy's induction is an example of the Rock Hall inducting an artist past his prime who was still fully capable of performing on a high level. From the opening guitar chords of "Damn Right, I've Got the Blues," you know Guy is about to kill it. Even his vocals hold up well. If you wanted more, you certainly got it. Guy then performed "Let Me Love You Baby" with B.B. King and Eric Clapton. It was seven minutes of stunning blue solos from three of the greatest guitarists of all time.

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24. Fleetwood Mac (1998)

Fleetwood Mac performed just one song as a full band (Though, Peter Green did not join in) during the 1998 ceremony. While the band said it would never tour again, the amazing acoustic performance of “Say You Love” me proved the band still had a lot left in the tank. The band’s time in the spotlight also included two understated, but fantastic songs from Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham in “Big Love” and “Landslide.”

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25. Jeff Beck opening/Rod Stewart Tribute (1994)

Jeff Beck opened the 1994 ceremony with a stunning instrumental performance of Curtis Mayfield’s “People Get Ready.” It stands as one of the best guitar showcases in Rock Hall history. He followed that up by inducting Rod Stewart, who stayed home to be with his family in California after a devastating earthquake.

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Kathy Willens

26. The Eagles (1998)

The Eagles proved that, perhaps, the group’s infighting had been a bit over-hyped by performing at the induction ceremony with two post-1980s members Bernie Leadon and Randy Meisner. Much like Fleetwood Mac, the Eagles were very much a band that had several years of stellar live performances ahead of them. During renditions of “Hotel California” and “Take It Easy," the guitar solos and vocals on both sounded as sweet as ever.

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Michael Loccisano

27. All-Star Jam (2012)

The Red Hot Chili Peppers’ induction performance transitioned seamlessly into the night’s All-Star Jam. Joined by Slash, Billie Joe Armstrong and Ron Wood on guitars, among other guests, The Chili Peppers launched into “Higher Ground.” And despite those guitarists being on hand, no one stood out more than Flea on bass. At one point, even George Clinton hops on the mic. It’s an utter thrill ride.

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Kathy Willens

28. Santana (1998)

Peter Green didn't perform with Fleetwood Mac at the 1998 ceremony. But he did join fellow inductee Santana for its rendition of "Black Magic Woman," a song Green wrote. The eight and half minute guitar showcase was mesmerizing (Carlos Santana was on fire). It was, arguably, the highlight of the night.

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Kevin Winter

29. All-Star Jam (2013)

The 2013 All-Star Jam seemed to feature everybody, including Heart, Rush, Tom Morello, Gary Clark Jr. Chris Cornell, Dave Grohl and more. Interestingly enough (and appropriately), Darryl McDaniels and Chuck D kick things off, drawing the line from hip-hop to blues before everyone else ignites a version of "Crossroads" that really highlights one of the most diverse nights in Rock Hall ceremony history.

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30. Bill Monroe Tribute (1997)

You could make the case Emmylou Harris, there to honor inductee Bill Monroe, was the performer of the night in 1997. Her duet with Ricky Skaggs on “Blue Moon of Kentucky” is one of the best live bluegrass showcases you will ever see. The same goes for her rendition of “Get Up John.” It’s hard to listen to the performance and not be reminded that Harris might deserve a place in the Rock Hall herself.

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Kevin Winter

31. Rush (2013)

Rush fans were in full force at the 2013 ceremony, giving their performance a fun energy no matter how well the band played. And Rush played very well. Things actually opened with Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins and Nick Rakulinecz imitating the band in fine fashion. The members of Rush then got in on the action and things reached epic proportions during "Tom Sawyer." It was one of the bet intros in Rock Hall Ceremony history. The band continued that energy into "Spirit of the Radio." You could make a case that Geddy Lee's voice ain't what it used to be. But it's still better than a lot of the aging rockers who take the stage at the Rock Hall ceremony each year.

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Ron Frehm

32. All-Star Jam (1990)

The 1990 jam session was quite an amazing (and, at times, odd mix). Carole King was inducted as a songwriter (with Gerry Goffin) and delivered a beautiful rendition of “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow” with help from James Taylor and others. Sting sang Bobby Darin’s “Mack the Knife” in German. And though it was just one song, The Four Seasons’ 1990 performance of “Goodnight Sweetheart, Goodnight” was extra special. It marked the last time the original group would perform on stage together. But the night's standout moment came when Pete Townshend picked up his acoustic guitar and played the opening chords to “Pinball Wizard.” If that wasn't enough, Simon & Garfunkel put their differences aside with a surprise performance of “Bridge Over Troubled Water” featuring Ben E. King.

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33. Neil Young (1995)

The 1995 ceremony was a big year for the inductions and featured some lengthy performances (which would start a trend from that point forward). Neil Young & Crazy Horse played just two songs – “Act of Love” and “F***** Up.” But they lasted more than 20 minutes thanks to all the guitar work and tuning sessions in between songs. Young doesn’t start singing until past three minute mark of “Act of Love,” but every moment of it is utterly mesmerizing.

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Stephen Lovekin

34. Metallica (2009)

In 2006, Metallica performed for Black Sabbath. Three years later, it was their turn. And the band certainly chose two songs to set the house on fire with “Master of Puppets” and “Enter Sandman.” Former member Jason Newsted even joined in on bass. It is, by far, the heaviest performance that’s ever been delivered at a Rock Hall ceremony, and one of the best.

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Kevin Winter

35. Albert King Tribute (2013)

Gary Clark Jr. does an excellent job tackling "Oh, Pretty Woman" for the Albert King tribute. The solos on the song are amazing. But it's when Booker T. Jones and John Mayer join Clark on "Born Under a Bad Sign" that things really pick up. Clark Jr.'s voice is a powerhouse and feeding off of Mayer's guitar playing for over 10 minutes brings out the best in both of them.

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Mike Coppola

36. Pearl Jam (2017)

It doesn't take a genius to predict Pearl Jam would have the best performance at the 2017 ceremony. The band still puts on amazing shows. What was astonishing is that the performance still, somehow, topped expectations. Pearl Jam was stellar on “Alive” and “Given to Fly,” while the crowd singing the opening of “Better Man” before Eddie Vedder hopped on the mic will give you chills.

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Kathy Willens

37. Solomon Burke (2001)

With all the big names at the 2001 Ceremony, it was Solomon Burke (strutting on stage with a robe over his shoulders before throwing it off) that proved the greatest showman. Burke's vocal performance was so staggering, even he has to take a moment to sit down.

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Michael Loccisano

38. The Stooges (2010)

Two years prior their own induction, The Stooges performed for Madonna, which was somewhat awkward. But Iggy going shirtless for "Search and Destroy" and "I Wanna Be Your Dog" (with Billie Joe Armstrong) in 2010 while pulling out all his classic moves was a dream scenario for rock fans. The solos are tight with Pop roaming around just looking for a way to come unhinged.

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39. Roxy Music (2019)

With a few artists opting not to perform in 2019, it left room for the artists that were ready to play to play long. It was disappointing not to see Brian Eno during Roxy Music’s induction. However, frontman Bryan Ferry and company proved they still have it during a six-song performance that spanned the band’s entire career. It was a reminder for anyone doubting Roxy Music’s Rock Hall worthiness (which should be no one) that Roxy was a band line no other.

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Gregory Bull

40. The Police (2003)

The Police's reunion at the 2003 ceremony was easily the night's most anticipated moment. Sting and company didn't disappoint, sounding reinvigorated on "Roxanne" and "Message in the Bottle." Stewart Copeland was absolutely annihilating the drums. Steven Tyler, Gwen Stefani and John Mayer hopped on stage to singalong to "Every Breath You Take," which was a nice touch.

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41. Ramones Tribute (2002)

“We’re Green Day. We’re going to play Ramones songs.” After a speech from Eddie Vedder that went on and on (and on). Green Day properly honored the Ramones with an old-school punk performance, tackling classics “Blitzkrieg Bob,” “Rockaway Beach” and “Teenage Lobotomy” with a raw fire.

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Associated Press

42. Billy Joel (1999)

Billy Joel would take the stage with several of the other honorees at the 1998 ceremony. But he managed to save a ton of energy for his opening performance of "Only The Good Die Young," which was a standout moment during one the biggest night's in the ceremony's history.

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Michael Loccisano

43. Red Hot Chili Peppers (2012)

It shouldn’t surprise anyone that the Chili Peppers’ performance at the 2012 ceremony was great, considering the band was still fairly close to its prime and the bandmembers have stayed in great shape. The Chili Peppers didn’t hold back one bit in closing the show with lights flashing everywhere as if to match up with Flea hitting his bass. This performance along was worth the price of admission.

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Gregory Bull

44. Elvis Costello (2003)

Costello played more of his songs than any other performer at the 2003 ceremony and they were all good. He blasted through a playlist of “Pump It Up,” “What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding,” “Deep Dark Truthful Mirror” and the Smokey Robinson cover “You’ve Really Got a Hold on Me.” It felt like, at times, Costello was still in his prime

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45. The Byrds (1991)

Perhaps there was no better act to be inducted and perform at the 1991 ceremony. With the Gulf War air campaign in full swing, the five members, reunited for the first time in seemingly forever, played three songs (with help from Don Henley and Jackson Browne). You never wanted it to end. Most appropriately one of those songs was “Turn! Turn! Turn!,” which famously contains the lyrics “A time to love, and a time to hate; a time of war, and a time of peace.”

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46. Stevie Nicks (2019)

Stevie Nicks held her own at the 2019 ceremony. But her performance was as much about the guests as the first woman to be inducted into the Rock Hall twice. The young women in the audience went wild for Harry Styles, who filled in admirably for the late Tom Petty on “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.” We also got a surprise appearance from Don Henley on “Leather and Lace.” The Eagles singer’s vocals weren’t the best, but his presence was one of those special Rock Hall moments fans live for.

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Seth Wenig

47. The Ronettes (2007)

During past Rock Hall ceremonies, some of the older vocal group typically got one song to shine. But The Ronettes broke the mold, performing "Baby, I Love You," "Walking in the Rain" and "Be My Baby." Props to Ronnie Spector, whose voice still sounded like an Amy Winehouse-esque force of nature.

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48. The Doors with Eddie Vedder (1993)

Vedder and Pearl Jam were huge at the time. But the singer knew his place at the 1993 ceremony, standing in for Jim Morrison on vocals but stepping back to let the living members of The Doors shine throughout on “Light My Fire” and “Break On Through.”

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Kevin Winter

49. Heart (2013)

Heart’s 2013 Induction performance opens with Nancy Wilson, one of the greatest female guitar players of all time, soloing on acoustic guitar. It’s hard for anything to go wrong after that. The full band joins in on the amazing “Crazy on You.” And, in case you were wondering, Ann Wilson’s voice is still majestic. Nancy Wilson plugs in, to everyone’s delight, for a rocking version of “Barracuda.” The solos from Wilson and guests Jerry Cantrell and Mike McCready are epic.

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50. Creedence Clearwater Revival (1993)

Fans thought they would be getting a CCR reunion at the Rock Hall Ceremony. And while John Fogerty, Stu Cook and Doug Clifford were all on stage together to give speeches, Fogerty opted to perform “Green River,” “Who’ll Stop The Rain” and “Born on the Bayou” with Bruce Springsteen and Robbie Robertson instead of his former bandmates. The performance was stellar. Though, it did lack the nostalgia factor that The Doors’ reunion featured at the same ceremony.

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Kathy Willens

51. Diana Ross (2000)

Few things in Rock Hall Ceremony history have felt so sophisticated and elegant as Diana Ross honoring Billie Holiday with "God Bless the Child." It's a flawless performance done in a traditional pop style.

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52. All-Star Jam (1991)

It was one of the more subdued ceremonies ever, as the 1990 Inductions took place right as the U.S. was bombing Baghdad. Thus the night took on a political tone. But the energy did pick up for the All Star Jam, when LaVern Baker, John Fogerty, Bruce Springsteen, Bonnie Raitt and Chaka Khan joined forces for everything from “People Get Ready” to “Proud Mary.” The highlight, by far, was the back-to-back wallop of Wilson Pickett’s “Mustang Sally” and “Midnight Hour.”

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Mark Lennihan

53. Pink Floyd with Billy Corgan (1996)

No one was holding their breath for a Pink Floyd reunion at the 1996 ceremony. So fans got David Gilmour and Richard Wright performing "Wish You Were Here" with Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan joining in on acoustic guitar. Though, as always, it was Gilmour's guitar playing that prove mesmerizing. It was a stripped down performance that a band, if at full force, could have done something grand. But that didn't stop it from being, arguably, the night's best showcase.

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Amy Sancetta

54. Crosby, Stills & Nash (1997)

Neil Young didn’t show up (to be honored with Buffalo Springfield) and the Jackson 5 opted not perform. But the 1997 ceremony still got a headliner in Crosby, Still & Nash. The band performed four songs, including “49 Bye-Byes,” “Wooden Ships” (featuring awesome guitar work) and “Teach Your Children” with James Taylor and Emmylou Harris. The vocals weren’t always on point. But moments like Tom Petty joining in on “For What It’s Worth” more than made up for it.

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Kathy Willens

55. Steely Dan (2001)

Maybe it's dad rock. But Steely Dan could still play the heck out of a song, in this case "Black Friday," in 2001. And the band's sound meshed perfectly with the Rock Hall's backing band. It fit the atmosphere as well as anything could.

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Tony Dejak

56. Jeff Beck (2009)

Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page going back and forth on guitar. It's about as amazing as you might expect. It's a jaw-dropping and memorable live guitar showcases that would inevitably extend into the night's all-star jam.

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Theo Wargo

57. Nina Simone tribute (2018)

Aside from The Moody Blues, Nina Simone got the most time in the spotlight at the 2018 ceremony. First, Andra Day delivered the night’s best vocal performance on “I Put a Spell on You” and “I Wish I Knew How it Would Feel to Be Free.” Then, Lauryn Hill took over. Her renditions of “Feeling Good” and “Black is the Color of My True Love’s Hair” radiated with power, while her freestyle rap on “Ain’t Got No, I Got Life” was absolutely dizzying.

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58. John Lee Hooker and Bonnie Raitt (1991)

The dynamic duo of the 1991 ceremony, John Lee Hooker and Bonnie Raitt slayed two blues classics. They were joined by John Popper and Robert Cray on “Baby Lee.” But it was the raw blues showcase of “I’m In the Mood” that really stood out.

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59. Chuck Berry and All Stars (1994)

The 1994 ceremony closed out with what you could call a jam session. Though, it was broken up to honor the individual artists. Berry led the way on two specific songs, honoring Willie Dixon with “Wang Dang Doodle” and then “Roll Over Beethoven” (the more lively of the two numbers). Members of the Grateful Dead joined in. With Jerry Garcia absent, it was the closest we got to a Grateful Dead performance.

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Julie Jacobson

60. The Pretenders (2005)

Chrissie Hynde and company brought their A-game to the 2005 ceremony, proving why The Pretenders were a first-ballot Hall of Famer. Neil Young even hopped on "My City Was Gone" to trade guitar licks with Hynde for a memorable moment.

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Evan Agostini

61. Darlene Love (2011)

An amazing voice like Darlene Love’s rarely goes away, which made her performance as the 2011 ceremony one of the standouts of the night. Her performance of “(Today I Met) The Boy I’m Gonna Marry” was pitch perfect. Bette Midler joined Love on “He’s a Rebel.” But no one was stealing the spotlight for Love (including Bruce Springsteen on guitar).

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Mike Coppola

62. Green Day (2015)

Having a first-ballot Hall of Famer means you get to see a band as close to their prime as possible. That was the case with Green Day, who had performed at multiple ceremonies prior to 2015. The band put on a fiery set that goes from the spark plug that is “American Idiot” into the opening riffs of “When I Come Around” and then the band’s breakthrough hit “Basket Case."

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Michael Loccisano

63. Faces (2012)

The lack of Rod Stewart took some oomph out of The Faces’ 2012 performance. But Ron Wood was game, stealing the show on guitar. It also helped that Mike Hucknall (Simply Red), who had been performing with the band since 2009, was on hand. The excellent performance peaked with “Stay With Me,” which turned into a fantastic singalong.

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64. Etta James (1993)

“Ladies and gentlemen, Miss Etta James.” That’s the proper way to introduce one of the greatest singers of all time. And James certainly delivered at the 1993 ceremony with her performance of “At Last.” Understated, yet totally nonetheless.

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Jeff Christensen

65. Black Sabbath Tribute (2006)

Many bands rush to reunite at Rock Hall ceremonies for performances that don’t live up to the hype. Black Sabbath took a pass, accepting the honor but letting Metallica stand in for them. That was fine with anyone in attendance, as Metallica delivered the heaviest set in Rock Hall history up until that point. Ozzy’s voice was missed a bit. But Kirk Hammett’s guitar playing and Robert Trujillo’s bass were unrelenting.

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Kathy Willens

66. Isaac Hayes (2002)

Now this is how you kick off an Induction Ceremony. With one of the great soul singers and songwriters of all time serving as a conductor of sorts in an epic performance of the "Theme From Shaft." Hayes wasn't exactly a young man, so he smartly let the Rock Hall band shine at various moments, which was thrilling to watch.

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Mike Coppola

67. Ringo Starr (2015)

Who doesn’t love a Beatles reunion? Even if it’s just the two living members. Not surprisingly, Ringo Starr’s induction (led by Paul McCartney) headlined the 2015 ceremony. There was an awkward moment where a lengthy changeover of instruments led to Starr getting upset. Otherwise, the performance was a lot of fun. Starr teaming up with Green Day for “Boys” was probably the best technical performance. But having just about every artist in attendance on hand for “With a Little Help From My friends” was special.

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Kevin Winter

68. Lou Adler tribute (2013)

Lou Adler produced Carole King's landmark album "Tapestry," which led to her paying tribute a performance of "So Far Away." Even those who weren't fully familiar with Adler's legacy had to be excited to see King at the piano, delivering a superb version of one of her classics.

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69. Janis Joplin Tribute (1995)

Melissa Etheridge’s stunning one-woman performance of “Piece of My Heart” is an example of the Rock Hall nailing it when it comes to having a younger performer honor an artist that has passed away.

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Ron Frehm

70. All-Star Jam (1987)

Despite 1987 being the first year a woman – Aretha Franklin – was inducted, the final All Star Jam was a male dominated affair. It’s incredible to see how packed the stage was with musicians for “Hey! Bo Diddley,” performed by the song's namesake Bo Diddley, B.B. King, Smokey Robinson, Paul Butterfield, Chuck Berry and others. The large group of musicians led to some disjointed moments. Still, moments like Carl Perkins leading “Blue Suede Shoes” with Keith Richards soloing next to him are priceless.

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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

71. Bobby Womack (2009)

Bobby Womack slayed with an opening acoustic version of “Across 110th Street.” But things really get fantastic when Ronnie Wood joins him for a medley of “If You Think You’re Lonely Now’ and “It’s All Over Now” (a song The Rolling Stones covered), the latter featuring a fantastic solo by Wood.

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Jason DeCrow

72. John Mellencamp (2008)

Mellencamp was the clear headliner at the 2008 ceremony for the simple fact that he’s the only one who performed his own songs. And Mellencamp could still rock in 2008. His performances of “Pink Houses” and “Authority Song” were lively showcases. But it was the acoustic version of “Small Town” that really highlighted the songwriting ability that earned him a place in the Rock Hall in the first place.

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Kathy Willens

73. All-Star Jam (2000)

Eric Clapton was the centerpiece of the All Star Jam, leading the way on "Route 66," "Sweet Home Chicago" and "I Shot the Sherrif." But the standout here was "Love and Happiness." The Al Green cover featured Bonnie Raitt and Clapton on guitars with Earth, Wind & Fire singing lead on the first verse. Raitt's voice didn't really suit the song on the second verse. But a touching moment where Natalie Cole joined Clapton for "Route 66" more than made up for it.

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74. Martha & The Vandellas (1995)

No one can accuse Martha & The Vandellas of failing to own their moment at the 1995 ceremony. The group stretched “Dancing in the Street” into a nine and half minute party anthem that consumed the theater.

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Danny Moloshok

75. Public Enemy

Of all the rap acts in the Rock Hall, Public Enemy is the one rock purists question the least. That’s because the spirit of rock and roll is crystal clear in PE. Chuck D seemed like he was on a mission at the 2013 ceremony, pulverizing the crowd with funky version of “Bring the Noise” and “Fight the Power" with Flavor Flav doing whatever it is he does all over the stage.

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Mike Coppola

76. All-Star Jam (2017)

The 2017 All-Star Jam was an extension of Pearl Jam’s set. In theory, it would have featured Neil Young had he not been sick (He was supposed to induct Pearl Jam). Still, the performance of “Rockin’ in the Free World” was a lot of fun, especially when Journey’s Neal Schon delivered an epic guitar solo about halfway through.

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Larry Busacca

77. The E Street Band (2014)

It’s hard to overstate just how exhausting the E Street Band’s induction was. Bruce Springsteen spoke for 16 minutes. Then each member of the band gave a lengthy speech. Of course, it’s hard to complain when the end result is a pretty damn good Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band performance featuring “The River,” “E Street Shuffle” and “Kitty’s Back.”

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Seth Wenig

78. Patti Smith (2007)

The Patti Smith Group stayed true to its in your face nature by delivering two crowd pleasing songs in "Because of the Night" and a cover of The Rolling Stones' "Gimme Shelter." The band also shocked everyone with "Rock N Roll N****" (and dedicated it to her mother). Just in case the crowd was getting too comfortable.

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79. Joni Mitchell tribute (1997)

Shawna Colvin’s performance of Joni Mitchell’s “Free Man in Paris” deserves mention. But the crowd really dug listening to James Taylor deliver Mitchell’s “Woodstock.” It is a song Taylor has performed numerous times. But this may have been his best yet.

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Courtesy of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

80. Freddie King tribute (2012)

A blueprint on how you pay tribute to a guitar legend. Billy Gibbons, Dusty Hill, Derek Trucks and Joe Bonamassa joined forces on Freddie King's "Going Down" and "Hide Away." None of them could quite match King's incendiary blues voice. But guitar wise, they did him justice, especially Trucks whose solos are otherworldly.

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Theo Wargo

81. David Bowie tribute (2016)

Opening the 2016 ceremony was a fantastic version of “Fame,” in honor of David Bowie, led by David Byrne and Kimbra. It was a nice mash up of stars, past and present, with The Roots band backing them up.

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Seth Wenig

82. Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five (2007)

No one really knew how this was going to go, as Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five was the first hip-hop act inducted into the Rock Hall. Led by the Grandmaster's DJ skills (As awesome as ever), the group commanded the stage. They went from potential outcasts to key members of the club.

83. Def Leppard (2019)

After a long (like, really long) speech, Def Leppard delivered the kind of performance expected by a classic rock act that can still fill arenas. They were very good. The special moment came at the end when Ian Hunter of Mott the Hoople joined the band for “All the Young Dudes.” It was nice to see Hunter on stage at a Rock Hall ceremony even if the performance wasn’t great. Perhaps Mott the Hoople will get in sooner rather than later.

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84. Bonnie Raitt (2000)

Raitt had already delivered some standout moments at Rock Hall Ceremonies. In 2000, it was her time to shine. Bruce Hornsby joined her for “I Can’t Make You Love Me.” But “Thing Called Love” with Melissa Etheridge next to her was the more lively showcase. Never underestimate the power of Raitt’s slide guitar skills.

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Jeff Christensen

85. New Orleans Tribute (2006)

With New Orleans still suffering from the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina, Elvis Costello, Allen Toussaint, Robbie Robertson and others joined forces for a tribute. It’s the performance from a so-so night that has probably held up best over time.

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86. Counting Crows (1993)

Counting Crows maybe didn't seem like all that of an exceptional choice to perform in honor of Van Morrison. The Rock Hall was trying to attract a younger audience and the Crows were huge at the time. But the band put together a great version of "Caravan" that sounds even better with time.

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Mike Coppola

87. The Paul Butterfield Blues Band (2015)

Seeing the living members of The Paul Butterfield Blues Band perform “Got My Mojo Working” at the 2015 ceremony was fun, even if it didn’t sound all the captivating. The best part of the tribute was Zac Brown and Tom Morello tackling “Born in Chicago.” Brown’s voice is amazing, while Morello takes his usual metal shredding and grounds it in the blues. It’s a shame they didn’t perform longer.

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Frank Micelotta

88. AC/DC (2003)

Essentially, as long as Brian Johnson’s voice held up, AC/DC remained a heck of a live band. That was the case at the 2004 Inductions during the band’s performance of “Highway to Hell.” The heaviness of the performance threatened to blow the roof off the arena. “You Shook Me All Night Long” took on a life of its own when Steven Tyler took over lead, which wasn't necessarily a good thing.

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Joe Tabacca

89. Jefferson Airplane (1996)

Member Jorma Kaukonen delivered a touching tribute with an instrumental acoustic performance of “Embryonic Journey.” The full band, minus Grace Slick, performed two other songs, including “Crown of Creation” and “Volunteers.” The latter, which closed the set, was rather energetic and solidly performed.

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Kathy Willens

90. All Star Jam (2001)

This was one of the more diverse jam sessions. Bono, Mary J. Blige and Melissa Etheridge teamed up for “Could You Be Loved." In perhaps, one of the most regrettable moments in Rock Hall history, Paul Simon, Marc Anthony and, yes, Jann Wenner sang “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard.” Solomon Burke continued his excellent run during the night, delivering “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love” with passion. Elsewhere, Brian May’s guitar solo on Steely Dan’s “Do It Again” was mind blowing.

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91. Traffic (2004)

Steve Winwood’s vocals weren’t the best during Traffic’s performance of “Dear Mr. Fantasy.” Where he more than made up for it was with his epic solos, which stood out even in what was one of the best ceremonies for guitar playing in Rock Hall history.

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Seth Wenig

92. All-Star Jam (2007)

The closing jam for 2007 had potential. Patti Smith’s led a rendition of her song “People Have the Power” with help from Eddie Vedder, Sammy Hagar, R.E.M. and others. Not everyone’s vocals match the track, however. Still, there’s an energy to the performance that certainly embodies the spirit of the song.

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Danny Moloshok

93. Randy Newman (2013)

Newman got the crowd going all on his own with the opening of "I Love L.A." And when it's revealed Newman is joined by Tom Petty, John Fogerty and Jackson Browne, fans went absolutely nuts. It's a great moment. The cameo's didn't end there, as Don Henley hopped a lively version of "I'm Dead (But I Don't Know It)."

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Kathy Willens

94. Eric Clapton (2000)

Clapton’s 2000 induction was interesting. Given the vast catalog he could choose, Clapton opted for two songs – the blues driven “Further On Up the Road” with Robbie Robertson and “Tears in Heaven.” The latter may have seemed like a surprising choice. But it was a such a massive hit and meaningful song for Clapton at the time.

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Theo Wargo

95. The Cars (2018)

The Cars hadn't signed up for such a major performance since Lollapalooza 2011. That's what made the precise nature of the performance, from Ric Ocasek's unique vocals to the precision of Elliot Easton's guitar work, so impressive.

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John Kuntz

96. Green Day’s “Letterbomb” (2012)

No, Green Day was not Inducted into the Rock Hall in 2012. But the band (on hand to induct Guns N’ Roses) was chosen to open the show with a kick-ass version of “Letterbomb.” In doing so, Billie Joe Armstrong dropped various f-bombs and set a raucous tone for a ceremony that can get a bit stiff.

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Julie Jacobson

97. ZZ Top (2004)

ZZ Top's memorable guitar riffs go over well in just about any setting. The 2004 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony was no exception. At times, the sound of the guitars threatened to overwhelm the vocals. But who cares when you getting that level of old-school blues?

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Mike Coppola

98. Tupac Shakur tribute (2017)

In paying homage to Shakur, the Rock Hall rolled out a variety of rappers, from Snoop Dogg and YG to T.I. and Naughty by Nature’s Treach. It was fun to wonder who might come next. But the standout moment actually came from Alicia Keys, who slowed things down for “Dear Mama” and “Changes," putting a focus on Shakur’s softer side.

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Mark Lennihan

99. All-Star Jam (1996)

Pete Seeger, inducted as an early influencer, led the finale jam session that included Stevie Wonder, David Byrne, Keith John, Joan Osbourne and members of Jefferson Airlplane. The performance included a stretched out version of “Goodnight, Irene.” Osbourne sang lead on “I Heart It Through The Grapevine.” Not surprisingly, however, it was Wonder’s own song that felt the most natural and rewarding in an all-star jam that was slightly less spectacular than those in the years that preceded it.

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Julie Jacobson

100. The O’Jays (2005)

The O’Jays delivered a classic performance at the 2005 ceremony that took you back to the golden era style of soul groups with choreographed dance moves. These were men far beyond their prime, but still capable of evoking their heyday of Philly Soul.

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Kathy Willens

101. Brenda Lee (2002)

Many people (especially younger ones) know Brenda Lee as the woman who sings "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree." Thus, the 2002 Induction Ceremony was a wake up call to many. The pioneering rock and roll singer, at the age of 57, delivered a refreshing performance that featured versions of "Dum Dum," "Sweet Nothin's" and "I'm Sorry."

102. The Staple Singers (1999)

You have to remember that Pop Staples was 84 at the time The Staple Singers took the stage in 1999. It’s a wonder he was able to even get up there. This is a case where the Rock Hall Jam Band, led by Paul Shaffer, played an integral part in the performance, which picked up in its second half when Mavis Staples belted out “I’ll Take You There.”

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Theo Wargo

103. Tom Petty Tribute (2018)

The Killers are no stranger to covering a Tom Petty song. The band's performance of "American Girl" was solid. It helps that frontman Brandon Flowers looked about as happy as anyone to be on stage that night. His passion filled the arena.

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Jeff Christensen

104. Wilson Pickett Tribute (2006)

Solomon Burke served as the life force to lead the opening Wilson Pickett tribute at the 2006 ceremony. It was a spirited start with assists from Leela James and Marc Broussard.

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Larry Busacca

105. Peter Gabriel (2014)

Gabriel kicked of the 2014 ceremony in fine fashion, proving that even at the age of 64, he’s quite the live act. Gabriel was great on “Digging in the Dirt.” But what pushed the performance over the top was Chris Martin’s dignified appearance on “Washing of the Water” and a surprise appearance by Youssou N’Dour on “In Your Eyes.”

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Theo Wargo

106. Steve Miller Band (2016)

Of all the classic rock bands that performed at the 2016 Induction ceremony, the only one that didn’t sound rusty was Steve Miller. His band was tight, which made for one the night’s more well-rounded performances of “The Joker,” “Rock’n Me’ and a cool extended jam of “Fly Like an Eagle.”

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107. The (Young) Rascals (1997)

You could argue whether or not The Young Rascals should have been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame over other acts. But the band’s performance was a lot of fun. It was also an example of an older act still sounding great, as the Rascals performed “Good Lovin’,” “Groovin’” and “People got to Be Free.”

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Jason DeCrow

108. Little Water tribute (2008)

Ben Harper gave a relatively short speech inducting Little Walter before letting the music do the talking. He, along with James Cotton, did Little Walter proud with versions of the blues legend's "My Babe" that found Harper delivering the goods on slide guitar.

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Theo Wargo

109. Sister Rosetta Tharpe Tribute (2018)

Singer/guitarist Felicia Collins was fresh off performing in the “Marie and Rosetta” musical, which made her performance of Sister Rosetta Tharpe’s “Strange Things Happening” rather seamless (But boy, can that woman solo). The addition of Alabama Shakes’ Brittany Howard and her powerful voice injected some serious blues into the performance and showcased how Tharpe’s impact is still felt today.

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110. Frankie Lymon Tribute (1993)

In the first year where younger artists were brought in to perform for Inductees, Boyz II Men proved a great choice to honor Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers. They’re one of the few modern acts who could capture that old school doo-wop vibe.

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Michael Loccisano

111. Dr. John

By 2011, the Rock Hall had perfected the art of creating moments, even for its more low-key inductees. Dr. John’s performance of “Right Place, Wrong Time,” was what you’d come to expect from the singer who can still take over a jazz fest or two. But it was seeing him on dual pianos with John Legend for “Such a Night) that was quite the sight. Legend overshadows Dr. John a bit, but it’s not Legend’s fault. He’s just that great.

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Mike Coppola

112. In memoriam/The “5” Royales tribute (2015)

Just as Leon Bridges was gaining buzz for his old-school style of crooning, the Rock Hall tapped him to sing the 2015 in memoriam and used “Dedicated To the One I Love” by inductee The “5” Royales. Paired with Steve Cropper, Bridges was the perfect choice and nailed the song's emotional power.

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Kathy Willens

113. The Moonglows (2000)

Perhaps the most underappreciated act of the 2000 induction. But easily one of the most important. The Moonglows' performance of “Ten Commandments of Love/Sincerely” performance was a delightful surprise, considering how old the members were.

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114. Curtis Mayfield Tribute (1999)

Here’s a combination you never thought you’d see. Clapton and D’Angelo teamed up to honor Curtis Mayfield. Clapton’s inclusion highlighted Mayfield’s underrated guitar playing. And while D’Angelo’s appearance was a clear attempt by the Rock Hall to include what’s hot in the moment, the R&B vocals vocal performance of “I’ve Been Trying” was absolutely stunning.

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Kathy Willens

115. Queen (2001)

It was interesting that Brian May chose to sing "We Will Rock You." Heck, maybe no one's worthy to stand in for Freddie Mercury at the Rock Hall Inductions. But, overall, Queen's performance seemed to lack something. But it did quickly turn into a singalong. Foo Fighters' Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins joined in on "Tie Your Mother Down," with Grohl handling himself quite well.

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Julie Jacobson

116. 50th Anniversary songs tribute (2005)

The 20th Rock Hall Ceremony also marked the 50th anniversary of some very important early rock and roll recordings. To celebrate, Bo Diddley, Robbie Robertson and Eric Clapton took the stage to perform “Bo Diddley.” After that, Jerry Lee Lewis hopped on piano for “Whole Lot of Shakin’ Going On.” These were special performances, no doubt. Though, after the nostalgia factor war off, they settled a bit into mundane territory.

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117. Lloyd Price (1998)

The performance of Lloyd Price’s “Stagger Lee” served as the de facto all-star jam in 1998. Price was joined by Allen Toussaint, Johnnie Johnson and John Fogerty during a performance that was fun, but also a bit anticlimactic given the other epic moments of the night.

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Kathy Willens

118. Aerosmith (2001)

The Rock Hall struck gold, inducting Aerosmith just three years after the band scored its first No.1 hit with “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing.” Clearly they were still relevant and delivered a great performance of “Jaded” that weaved into the Joe Perry showcase “Train Kept a Rollin.’” It’s too bad things didn’t stop there. Kid Rock’s voice on “Sweet Emotion” is just something you can't un-hear.

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Kathy Willens

119. All-Star Jam (2002)

The 2002 All Star Jam began rough, as “Take Me To the River” had to be performed twice due to technical difficulties. A lot of the big names from the ceremony skipped out on the finale. Though, fans did see Darlene Love sing “He’s a Rebel” with Gene Pitney and, for some reason, Rob Thomas and Jewel singing “Here Comes The Sun.” The highlight saw Isaac Hayes and Steve Cropper joining forces with legend Sam Moore for a performance of “When Something Is Wrong With My Baby."

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Seth Wenig

120. R.E.M. (2007)

R.E.M. handled its own songs – "Begin the Begin," "Man on the Moon" (with Eddie Vedder) and "Gardening at Night" – in typical R.E.M. fashion. The surprise (and regrettable) moment came when Patti Smith joined the group for "I Wanna Be Your Dog." There's a lot to be said for well intentions. But it's hard to replicate Iggy and The Stooges' raw energy.

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Charles Sykes

121. Linda Ronstadt tribute (2014)

Talk about a star-studded tribute. The celebration Ronstadt began with Carrie Underwood’s solid version of “Different Drum.” Then, Emmylou Harris and Bonnie Raitt walk on stage to lead a beautiful and moving rendition of “Blue Bayou.” The set closed out with a somewhat forgettable Stevie Nicks-led version of “It’s So Easy.” But the peak moment came right before that as Sheryl Crow hoped on a thrilling version of “You’re No Good.”

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Michael Loccisano

122. Songwriters tribute (2010)

The 2010 Inductions honored some of the greatest songwriters of all time, including Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, Otis Blackwell, Jesse Stone and Mort Shuman. While it may not have been the most high profile tribute of the night, the Rock Hall put together a nice showcase. You could take each of these separately, but we’ll include them as one for ranking purposes. Eric Burdon (“We Gotta Get Outta This Place”) and Ronnie Spector (“Be My Baby”) performed well on their own hits while FeFe Dobson was shockingly good channeling Tina Turner on “River Deep, Mountain High.” Chris Isaak has been known to cover Elvis and his rendition of the Blackwell-penned “Don’t Be Cruel” felt natural. Though you could make the case Peter Wolf stole the tribute on “Money Honey.”

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Evan Agostini

123. Alice Cooper (2011)

Few artists have been committed to their Rock Hall induction as Alice Cooper. While many treat it like a glorified jam session, Alice Cooper put on a full spectacle, which included the frontman wearing a snake around his neck during his speech. The highlight of the band's visually striking performance was "School's Out," which featured a cameo by Rob Zombie and several school children singing the chorus while wearing Alice Cooper makeup.

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John Kuntz

124. In Memorium/Etta James tribute (2012)

Etta James died just months before the 2012 ceremony, giving the Rock Hall a chance to pay proper tribute to the singer during the in memoriam portion of the show. R&B singer Ledisi took on the massive task of singing “At Last” and nailed it.

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Kathy Willens

125. James Taylor (2000)

It was going to be hard for James Taylor to top some his previous Rock Hall Ceremony moments. But Taylor’s timeless songs, especially “Fire and Rain,” always went over well no matter what the occasion. His 2000 Induction wasn’t a spectacular performance, but it got the job done.

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Jason DeCrow

126. Jimmy Cliff (2010)

Jimmy Cliff initially seemed pretty laid back during the Inductions. But once his performance started, he really got into it. Cliff was clearly in the zone during “Many Rivers to Cross,” while the full band, including a cameo by Wyclef Jean, kicked into full gear for “The Harder They Come.”

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Charles Sykes

127. Joan Baez (2017)

Seeing Joan Baez perform felt historic. She’s a true legend. Her low-key set felt even more momentous when she invited of the Indigo Girls and Mary Chapin Carpenter on stage with her. “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” turned into a mesmerizing singalong. The only thing missing was a warm fire.

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Mark Lennihan

128. Little Willie John Tribute (1996)

Keith John, son of Little Willie John and a great singer in his own right, paid tribute to his father with help from Stevie Wonder. Keith held his own during a rendition of “Fever.” And props to Wonder for playing wing man during the performance, allowing the younger John to shine.

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129. Duane Eddy (1994)

Eddy’s performance of his hit “Rebel Rouser” might have gotten a bit lost with all the other star power at the 1994 ceremony. But he certainly proved why he is one of the greatest instrumental rock and roll stars of all time.

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Mike Coppola

130. Electric Light Orchestra (2017)

ELO's performance was broken up into two parts. The band opened the ceremony with a tribute to Chuck Berry by performing its cover of "Rollover Beethoven." The second part of the band's performance, which came after their induction speeches, featured versions of "Evil Woman" and "Mr. Blue Sky." It was solid if all a bit too brief.

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Nicolas Khayat

131. Jackson Browne (2004)

In a night of lively performances, Jackson Browne’s set was like the eye of the storm. Yet, while Browne could have done something more understated (like acoustic versions of his songs) he played with a full band that kept the energy somewhat up, especially on “Running on Empty.”

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Charles Sykes

132. Glenn Frey Tribute (2016)

In honor of the late Glenn Frey, Sheryl Crow and Grace Potter teamed up for an acoustic performance of “New Kid In Town.” They made a nice pairing during a moving tribute to one of Frey’s trademark songs with the Eagles.

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Nicolas Khayat

133. All-Star Jam (2004)

The 2004 All Star Jam featured a group performance of Chuck Berry’s “Sweet Little Rock and Roller” that never really got going. Though, Keith Richards guitar playing that stood out. Saving the entire thing from total disaster was the surprise appearance by Dave Mason, who didn’t perform with Traffic, but led a stellar version of “Feelin’ Alright.”

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134. Gene Vincent Tribute (1998)

You can bet anytime Jeff Beck takes the stage at the Rock Hall ceremony, his guitar is going to steal the show. That was the case as he performed “Be-Bop-A-Lula” with Jonny Lang to honor inductee Gene Vincent. Lang was an interesting choice to sing on the song as his rough, bluesy vocals felt a bit over the top for the song, which kept it from true greatness.

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Jason DeCrow

135. Leonard Cohen tribute (2008)

Damien Rice has his own collection of slow-burners that stay with you. So it made sense that he'd tackle Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah." Rice's voice to doesn't lend itself to the kind of transcendent cover that Jeff Buckley did. But it was a beautiful performance none the less.

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Tony Dejak

136. Beastie Boys (2012)

Adam Yauch's illness (and his death weeks later) made the Beastie Boys induction bittersweet. The band did not perform. But Mix Master Mike let a tribute featuring Kid Rock, Travie McCoy and The Roots. The green ADIDAS jump suits were a nice touch. But it was The Roots band that deserves all the credit, especially on a fiery version of "Sabotage."

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Jason DeCrow

137. Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff tribute (2008)

Though his voice held up well, Jerry Butler’s “Only the Strong Survive” seemed like an odd choice for the Gamble and Huff tribute in 2008. They simply have better known songs, which sort of killed the excitement. However, Patti LaBelle’s version of “If You Don’t Know Me By Now” was much better. LaBelle channeled her gospel background for a vocal performance that came across like a religious experience.

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Kathy Willens

138. The Flamingos (2001)

It’s brave to tackle a song know for its vocals that you perfected more than 40 years prior. But The Flamingos handled themselves well on “I Only Have Eyes for You.”

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Ed Betz

139. Nat “King” Cole Tribute (2000)

Simply telling you that Ray Charles sat at a piano singing Nat King Cole’s “Nature Boy,” you’d probably be awe struck. To watch it is something else. Charles vocals weren’t the best at that point in his life. But they were serviceable. And at a 2000 ceremony, it was just a delight to see a legend like that give it a go.

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Julie Jacobson

140. Bob Seger (2004)

The 2004 performance of “Old Time Rock and Roll” and “Turn the Page” marked Bob Seger’s first show after an eight-year hiatus. Reuniting with the Silver Bullet Band, Seger sounded rusty. But you could tell he was fully capable of rounding back into form.

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Mark Duncan

141. Bill Withers Tribute (2015)

Bill Withers didn't perform, but the fact Stevie Wonder inducted him was enough to get Withers on stage. Wonder absolutely slays "Ain't No Sunshine." Later, John Legend provides a fantastic vocal on "Use Me." Together, Wonder and Legend's version of "Lean on Me" is a bit heavy handed (and slow). But that can be forgiven since Withers kind of, sort of sings on that one.

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142. Bob Marley Tribute (1994)

This was admirable, yet odd. Instead of bringing in a younger artist to handle a performance for Bob Marley, the Rock Hall left that to his family and friends, including Marley’s backing vocal group the I Threes singing “Redemption Song.” Ziggy Marley and family took the lead (with help from Bono and, uh, Whoopi Goldberg) on “One Love.”

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Adam Nadel

143. The Mamas and the Papas (1998)

The Mamas and the Papas’ performance was more a touching tribute than a great performance. With the late Cass Elliot absent, the living members of the group performing “California Dreamin’” couldn’t help but feel a bit karaoke. Yet, it was a beautiful way of honoring their friend and bandmate.

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144. Del Shannon Tribute (1999)

The Del Shannon tribute gave us two versions of “Runaway.” The first, led by Bonnie Raitt didn’t quite feel right. Then Billy Joel joined in and we got a rendition that was worthy of the rock and roll pioneer.

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Jason DeCrow

145. The Ventures (2008)

The Ventures' performance might have set a record for lack of movement at a Rock Hall ceremony. The members were well into their 70s and not all that energetic. But their playing was spot on, especially during “Walk Don’t Run."

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Tony Dejak

146. Don Kirshner tribute (2012)

As she did a year earlier, Darlene Love delivered a great vocal this time in honor of Don Kirshner. Backed by an orchestra, Love performed an elegant rendition of “Will You Still Love me Tomorrow.”

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Evan Agostini

147. Leon Russell (2011)

Russell's voice wasn't in the greatest shape at the 2011. His singing of "A Song for You" was rough, to say the least. But it never reaches cringe-worthy, mostly because you find yourself rooting him on so much. John Mayer's brilliant guitar work took much of the pressure off. And the full band on "Delta Lady" was a big help. Russell's entire induction was emotionally moving, coming just five years before he died.

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Ed Betz

148. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers (2002)

This was sort of Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers lite. While the band performed well, Petty’s vocal performance was overly restrained, not quite delivering the performance of “Last Dance With Mary Jane” or “American Girl” fans expected.

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Evan Agostini

149. All-Star Jam (2011)

Closing out 2011 was a two-part all-star jam. Lloyd Price led the way on “Stagger Lee,” which also featured Elton John, Dr. John and Leon Russell. Darlene Love then took hold of “Da Doo Run Run” with a host of guests on stage including Bette Midler, Alice Cooper and Bruce Springsteen. The first half of the jam was better from a technical standpoint. But “Da Doo Run Run” was the kind of lively celebration that should close out the inductions.

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Kathy Willens

150. Gene Pitney (2002)

It took Pitney several nominations to get into the Rock Hall. Unfortunately, his induction came during a packed year, making his performance somewhat forgettable. But it wasn’t for lack of trying. Pitney was still performing rather steadily around the time and it showed.

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151. Mahalia Jackson Tribute (1997)

In honoring the late Mahalia Jackson, Mavis Staples gave a raw performance of “Didn’t It Rain,” a song that isn’t easy to sing. It had a few spotty points, but overall was a nice way to honor the Early Influencer.

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Chuck Crow

152. All-Star Jam (2015)

The 2015 Ceremony probably should have ended with Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney and a host of stars singing “With a Little Help From My Friends.” Instead, the party kept going with an all-star version of “I Wanna Be Your Man” that started rough. No one really knew how to sing the song. Fortunately, the guitars saved the day. Billie Joe Armstrong and Joe Walsh’s solo kickstarted a stellar run of playing that was derailed by more bad singing from McCartney in the end.

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Mark Lennihan

153. The Shirelles (1996)

The Shirelles’ performance was rather quick, incorporating two songs – “I Met Him On a Sunday” and “Soldier Boy” – both performed with sophistication, but in a subdued fashion.

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Chuck Crow

154. Joan Jett & the Blackhearts (2015)

Anyone who has seen the 2015 Rock Hall Ceremony will have a hard time forgetting the awesome image of Joan Jett strutting out to open the show. Thus begins a great performance of “Bad Reputation.” Whoever came up with that idea of a cold open is a genius. Dave Grohl joined Jett on “Cherry Bomb,” while Miley Cyrus and Tommy James hopped on “Crimson and Clover.” James’ presence was a nice touch on the latter. But the song just seems to go on and on…and on. Four and a half minutes feels like an eternity.

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AP Photo/Gregory Bull

155. Righteous Brothers (2003)

The crowd was certainly excited for the Righteous Brothers’ performance of “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling.” Was it the best performance in the world? No. But it was surprising how much the vocals did hold up.

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Amy Sancetta

156. The Bee Gees (1997)

The Bee Gees' have so many hits, it was a wise and crowd pleasing decision for the band to deliver a medley of its best songs. Unfortunately, the vocals didn't always hold up. Though, "How Deep Is Your Love" was a standout, while "Staying Alive" got the crowd moving.

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Charles Sykes

157. Prince tribute (2017)

One of the most anticipated moments of the 2017 ceremony was its Prince tribute, which would be led by Lenny Kravitz. Yet, while Kravitz is a clear disciple of the Purple One, the performance didn’t produce the sort of life-altering moment fans were hoping for. The gospel backed, funked out version of “When Doves Cry” and “The Cross” were merely okay.

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Jason DeCrow

158. The Hollies (2010)

The Hollies wisely paired their performance with two popular contemporary acts. The band played “Bust Stop” and “Carrie Anne” with Maroon 5. It was a bit disjointed at the start. But Adam Levine starts to hit his groove during “Carrie Anne.” Yet, the best performance came on “Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress,” as Train’s Pat Monahan served as a much better fit on lead vocals.

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Charles Sykes

159. Hall & Oates (2014)

Hall & Oates were so annoyed at how long the E Street Band’s induction took, the duo rushed into their own performance. That led to a false start. “I have no monitors. What did Bruce blow them out?” joked Daryl Hall. It was the right move, as the performance was rough at the start. It got better and Hall really hit his peak solo on the piano for part of “I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do).”

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Kathy Willens

160. Earth Wind & Fire (2000)

Earth, Wind & Fire is Earth, Wind & Fire. A live show is gonna be fun. But the band wasn’t anywhere near its peak powers in 2000, leaving a lot to be desired in its performance. The playing was solid. The vocals were so-so. And wasn’t everyone just begging for a rendition of “September?”

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Tony Dejak

161. Wanda Jackson (2009)

Armed with her pink guitar, Wanda Jackson's performance was an eye opener. She delivered this sweet speech. But the opening of "Mean Mean Man" had some serious kick to it.

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Danny Moloshok

162. Quincy Jones tribute (2013)

We might be nitpicking here, but it might have been nice for the Quincy Tribute to feature a song NOT by Michael Jackson, as there’s so much more to Jones’ career than his legendary work with the King of Pop. As it stands, Usher does a serviceable rendition of “Rock With You.” His dance moves prove slightly better than his voice, which can’t help but be inferior to Jackson’s.

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Tony Dejak

163. Guns N’ Roses (2012)

The build up to Guns N’ Roses’ Rock Hall Induction was rather insane, considering it looked like the entire band would reunite, until Axl Rose turned into, well, Axl Rose. Alter Bridge’s Myles Kennedy, who plays in Slash’s band, stepped in admirably. Yet, while the rest of the members of GN’R gave it their best, Kennedy simply isn’t Rose.

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Henny Ray Abrams

164. Little Anthony & the Imperials (2009)

Little Anthony & the Imperials actually released a new album in 2008. So the group was ready to go for the 2009 ceremony and it showed. It took a minute for some of the rust and/or nerves to wear off. But by the time the group got to the end of its performance, things were clicking nicely.

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Kathy Willens

165. Paul Simon (2001)

Simon’s 2001 performance feels like such an afterthought. He’s Paul Simon, so vocally it was decent. There just wasn’t anything special about him singing “Still Crazy After all These Years” and “Graceland." And why was he wearing that awful hat?

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Danny Moloshok

166. Donna Summer tribute (2013)

There’s no denying Jennifer Hudson can sing. But she has a tendency to go all out, ALL THE TIME. Her version of Donna Summer’s "Last Dance" lacks the slow build element that makes the song so special. She faired better on the more lively “Bad Girls.”

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Mark Duncan

167. Lou Reed tribute (2015)

Beck does a great job of channeling the spirit of Lou Reed on "Satellite of Love." It's the backup singers who are the problem. Karen O and Nick Zinner avoided such problems, essentially just doing a solid Yeah Yeah Yeahs cover of Reed's "Vicious."

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Tony Dejak

168. Laura Nyro tribute (2012)

Sara Bareilles’ performance of Laura Nyro’s “Stoney End” was good and sounded like, well, a Sara Bareilles song. It was also an odd choice, considering the song penned by Nyro was made more famous by other singers.

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Michael Zorn

169. Bon Jovi (2018)

Despite what the HBO telecast suggests, Bon Jovi went first at the 2018 ceremony for the simple fact that he was so damn anxious. The band was the clear headliner. Yet, while Bon Jovi remains an act that can fill arenas with ease, the band has had better performances. Richie Sambora was great. Jon Bon Jovi probably had a better time at the after party.

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Charles Sykes

170. Yes (2017)

The guys from Yes look really old. But they sounded sort of young at the 2017 ceremony. Steve Howe’s guitar solo on “Owner of a Lonely Heart” was exceptional, even if a six-minute version of the song felt like a bit much. Rush’s Geddy Lee joined the band for “Roundabout,” which was awesome to see. Yet, while Jon Anderson’s vocals were strong on “Owner of a Lonely Heart,” they weren’t quite up to the elaborate instrumentation of “Roundabout.”

Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (139)

171. The Zombies (2019)

It’s painful to say, but this was bad. The Zombies were one of those bands on the cusp of getting into the Rock Hall for years and years. When they finally were inducted, the bandmembers were far passed their prime. Neither Rod Argent or Colin Blunstone could carry much of a note at the 2019 ceremony. The band was clearly rusty (especially Blunstone), leaving a lot to be desired.

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Phil Long

172. The Allman Brothers Band (1995)

Guitars were on fire during The Allman Brothers Band’s 1995 performance. But the entire thing was marred by Gregg Allman, who was heavily boozed up and on the verge of liver failure at the time. He was unable to make rehearsal and didn't hold up his end of the performance.

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Amy Sancetta

173. Parliament-Funkadelic (1997)

If you’re going to perform “Give Up the Funk (Tear The Roof Off Sucker),” I suppose it should be a showstopper. Parliament-Funkadelic’s 1997 performance was anything but. The first half of the performance was an mess. But the jamming section saved it, especially a call and response portion where George Clinton got the crowd involved.

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Jason DeCrow

174. All-Star Jam (2010)

The songwriters tribute transitioned into an all-star jam of “Shake, Rattle and Roll.” It hit or miss depending on who was singing. Rob Thomas and Ronnie Spector seemed less than excited, while Eric Bourdon and Peter Wolf were on fire. Then there was Chris Isaak who kind of always seems like he’s doing an Elvis impersonation.

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Charles Sykes

175. Chicago (2016)

No Peter Cetera on-hand meant any chance of Chicago playing music from its 1980s catalog went out the window. That allowed "25 to 6 to 4" and "Saturday in the Park" to be the centerpieces of the band's set. The former was better, as the members of Chicago don't sound as lively as they used to (not even close). Still, they didn't embarrass themselves, which meant a win at the 2016 ceremony.

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Evan Agostini

176. Jack Holzman tribute (2011)

It was probably one of the more forgettable performances of 2011 (or any year, really). Judy Collins honored Elektra Records founder and Ahmet Ertegun Award winner Jac Holzman by singing “Both Sides Now.” It was a lovely performance, but got completely lost in the shuffle of a busy night.

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David Richard

177. Chris Cornell tribute (2018)

Chris Cornell’s death sadly highlights the fact that Soundgarden is long overdue for Rock Hall induction. In honor of the fallen grunge singer, Seattle rockers Ann Wilson and Jerry Cantrell delivered a stripped down version of “Black Hole Sun” that, at times, begged for a full band in between all the vocal screaming from Wilson.

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Ron Frehm

178. Axl Rose and Bruce Springsteen (1994)

Some people remember this fondly. There's certainly a wow factor to watching Axl Rose and Bruce Springsteen trade vocals on The Beatles' classic "Come Together." While it was a great moment in Rock Hall Ceremony history, it wasn't necessarily a great (or even good) performance. Rose's voice is awful on this one and Springsteen isn't much better. It's a John Lennon tribute we'd rather forget.

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Jason DeCrow

179. The Dave Clark Five tribute (2008)

The Dave Clark Five’s Rock Hall induction was rather tragic. Singer Mike Smith passed away while preparing to attend the ceremony in New York. Joan Jett stepped in to lead a tribute to the band. The first performance was of “Bits and Pieces.” John Mellencamp, John Fogerty and Billy Joel joined in for “Glad All Over.” It didn’t lack for enthusiasm, but it also wasn't the least bit memorable.

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Kathy Willens

180. Dusty Springfield Tribute (1999)

For the second time, Melissa Etheridge was asked by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame to honor one of the great female artists of all time. She nailed it back in 1995 performing Janis Joplin’s “Piece of My Heart.” Her version of Dusty Springfield’s “Son of a Preacher Man” wasn’t nearly as good. Part of the problem was the arrangement. But Etheridge was also not the ideal choice, as her voice doesn’t suit the song

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Charles Sykes

181. Journey

For better or worse, if you've seen Journey perform over the past few years, you'd already seen the band's Rock Hall performance. There wasn't anything special about it. In fact, it was bit anti-climactic after Steve Perry gave a heart-warming speech but didn't perform. And while current singer Arnel Pineda was on hand, even he's starting to sound a bit old.

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Jeff Christensen

182. Blondie (2006)

Blondie's 2006 induction was all about the drama, as the original members couldn't come through on a proper reunion (Things got quite tense). Still, the Debbie Harry-led current lineup of the band took the stage for "Call Me," "Heart of Glass" and "Rapture." With the nostalgia of a reunion out of the way, it's easy to focus on how uneventful the performance actually was. Maybe it was karma for Harry refusing to play with her original bandmates.

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Julie Jacobson

183. Percy Sledge (2005)

Sledge is famous for one song. So, obviously, he was going to perform that tune for his 2005 induction. At 64, "When a Man Loves a Woman" was a bit too much for even Sledge to live up to. The vocals just weren't there (Neither was the arrangement for that matter). Sledge redeemed himself during the final third of the performance, getting on his knees to pay tribute to his wife Rosa.

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Jason DeCrow

184. Madonna tribute (2008)

Well this was weird. Madonna invited The Stooges of all people to perform for her as an act of protest that the rock band had yet to be inducted. The move all but assured the band would get in two years later. But the performance itself of "Burning Up" and "Ray of Light" is awkward to say the least. It feels like one of those weird mashups someone does on YouTube. a protest, it gets an A+. As a performance, it's something you'd rather forget.

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Jason DeCrow

185. Genesis tribute (2010)

Genesis not reuniting was a big disappointment at the 2010 ceremony. Phish stepped. But it wasn’t the same. Granted, Phish’s rendition of “Watcher of the Skies” was far more lively than the dull “No Reply at All.” That's not saying much.

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Charles Sykes

186. Cheap Trick (2016)

The words "I Want You to Want Me" brought a huge roar from the crowd at the 2016 ceremony. But it was all downhill from there. Robin Zander's vocals aren't what they used to be, which didn't hurt the rendition of Cheap Trick's biggest hit that much. But it made "Surrender" quite cringe-worthy.

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Tony Dejak

187. Donovan (2012)

This wasn’t the ideal year for Donovan to be inducted. There was some incredible performances featuring some of the biggest bands in the world. Donovan’s folk performance of “Catch the Wind” and “Sunshine Superman” is about as boring as it gets. For what it’s worth, John Mellencamp almost salvages things hopping on stage for “Season of the Witch.”

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David Richard

188. The Moody Blues (2018)

It's hard to argue against The Moody Blues' induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. But that doesn't make the band's performance any less snooze worthy. The Moody Blues played five songs, each more likely to put you into a coma.

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Julie Jacobson

189. The Dells (2004)

The Dells stepped up and attempted a performance of "Oh, What a Night" on a rock heavy night. Sadly, the performance was a bit of a mess with vocals that didn't match and a band that was overplaying.

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Jason DeCrow

189. ABBA tribute (2010)

Hearing Faith Hill was going to sing “The Winner Takes It All” with Benny Anderson on piano sort of suggest a snooze fest. Still, Hill's vocal performance isn’t the greatest here, suggesting there may have been a better choice out there.

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Seth Wenig

190. Van Halen Tribute (2007)

To say that Velvet Revolver doesn’t sound like Van Halen would be an understatement. Though, VR was far more capable of a good performance than any version of Van Halen at that point. All of this would have been sufficient had Sammy Hagar and ex-bass player Michael Anthony not gotten up there for a horrific version of “Why Can’t This Be Love.”

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Jeff Christensen

191. Lynyrd Skynyrd (2006)

The tragic story of Lynyrd Skynyrd was always going to put a damper on the band’s Rock Hall Induction to some degree. But the performance was a bit of a mess. The rendition of “Free Bird” lacked spirit, while “Sweet Home Alabama,” featuring Kid Rock, never really took on the party vibe it should have.

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Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (161)

Evan Agostini

192. Neil Diamond (2011)

There probably isn't a better performer suited for a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction in front of a bunch of rich people in tuxedos sitting at tables. "Sweet Caroline" is tailor-made for them, especially when Diamond walks into the crowd, starts hugging people and inviting friends to singalong, no matter how awkward it gets. Oh, this wasn't good. It was more like your drunk uncle at the wedding who someone forgot to take the microphone from.

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Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (162)

Stan Honda

193. Ricky Martin (2001)

Here’s something the Rock Hall would probably have us forget – Ricky Martin inducting Ritchie Valens and then having Martin perform a bland medley featuring “Come On Let’s Go,” “Donna” and “La Bamba.” This was a case of the Rock Hall regrettably opting for star power over a more logical (and obvious) choice like Los Lobos.

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Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (163)

Charles Sykes

194. All-Star Jam (2016)

The 2016 Inductions weren't great. And it all ended with one of the more disappointing All-Star Jams in Rock Hall history. Sure, the amount of 1970s rockers on stage made for a nostalgia trip. But butchering a Fats Domino classic with subpar vocals tends to ruin things. Ain’t that a shame? You're damn right.

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Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (164)

Charles Sykes

195. Cat Stevens (2014)

Other than the E Street Band talking for what felt like forever, Cat Stevens/Yusuf Islam's Induction was the slowest part of the 2014 ceremony. It didn't help that Stevens' voice wasn't great (same goes for the off-key backup singers). Acoustic performances are always hard at the Rock Hall Inductions, especially when you're surrounded by bigger and louder acts throughout the night. Still, Stevens' rendition of "Wild World" is especially cringe-worthy.

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Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (165)

Charles Sykes

196. Deep Purple (2016)

Deep Purple singer Ian Gillan was insistent back stage that guitarist Ritchie Blackmore was welcome to attend but not to perform (Blackmore didn’t show up). But Gillan was the one who shouldn't have performed. Whether or not he has it anymore is a different debate. But he certainly didn’t have it that night with one of the worst vocals in Rock Hall ceremony history, despite the rest of the band on stage being solid.

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197. The Lovin’ Spoonful (2000)

Two things were easy with this list -- choosing No. 1 and choosing this performance as last. Lovin’ Spoonful has the distinction of being the first, unquestionably bad performance in Rock Hall Ceremony history. The playing was bad. The vocals were worse. The Rock Hall knew this and wisely didn’t include it on the Vol. 6 of its official release series. Let’s pretend it didn’t happen.

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Every Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony performance ranked from best to worst (2024)
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